Adolescents (ages 12-18)

 teenag3

Things you can do...  

 

  • Hug your children often and tell them that you love them.
  • Ask your children about what they are doing and thinking.
  • Tell them about your day, too. Form the habit of frequent conversation.
  • Introduce your child to people you know and people that you meet.
  • Really listen when your child talks.
  • Introduce yourself to each one of your child's teachers, and check-in with them once every other month.
  • Give your children opportunities to spend time with other adults-trusted neighbors, favorite teachers, or relatives they feel comfortable with and like being around.
  • Speak highly of your child.
  • Have a family calendar on which all family members (including parents) note where they will be and when they will return.
  • Don't assume having a teenager means trouble.  

 

It's important to know that...  

 

Your child is working to find her independence, and this is important, but it is also important for you to stay involved. Always remember that you are your child's most important role model. Young people need adults they can turn to for advice in their lives in addition to their parents. Your child may be starting to seem like a different person, but she still needs love and affection from you.

Infants and Toddlers (birth to age 2)
Preschoolers (ages 3-5)
Elementary-Age Children (ages 6-11)
 

Take the Time for Kids in Your Community