Middle Housing / HB 2001

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Middle Housing

What is middle housing / HB 2001?

House Bill (HB) 2001 is a 2019 Oregon law requiring local governments to increase opportunities for middle housing – buildings that have living units for two or more households, but fewer than a typical apartment building. HB 2001 allows property owners to create middle housing in neighborhoods where most houses are single detached.  See Middle Housing: Additional Details

By allowing more middle housing, people will have more options to live where they want. Middle housing can create housing opportunities for:

Types of middle housing included in HB 2001

 

Duplex

Duplexes

Triplex

Triplexes

Quadplex

Quadplexes (Fourplexes)

  • Two units per lot
     
  • Separate entrances from outside
     
  • Shared wall or floor/ ceiling separating units 
     
  • Units are side-by-side or stacked
     
  • Rental/condo ownership
     
  • Often has garage and private outdoor area
     
  • Allowed in most residential districts
  • Three units per lot
     
  • Door to shared entry or outside
     
  • Shared wall or floor/ ceiling separating units 
     
  • Units are side-by-side or stacked
     
  • Rental/condo ownership
     
  • Often has garage and private outdoor area
     
  • Allowed in most residential districts
  • Four units per lot
     
  • Door to shared entry or outside
     
  • Shared wall or floor/ ceiling separating units 
     
  • Units are side-by-side, stacked or combination
     
  • Rental/condo ownership
     
  • Often has garage and private outdoor area
     
  • Allowed in most residential districts

 

Townhouse

Townhouses

Cottage cluster

Cottage Clusters

  • Two or more attached side-by-side units on separate lots
     
  • Separate entrance(s)
     
  • Shared wall(s) separating units
     
  • Ownership; units may be rented
     
  • Usually has garages and private outdoor areas 
     
  • Allowed in most residential districts 
     
  • Sites are partitioned or subdivided to create lots for each unit
  • Multiple small houses on one lot or individual lots 
     
  • Entrances usually face a central courtyard, open space or street
     
  • Unit have parking area/ garage or shared parking
     
  • Rental/condo ownership
     
  • Only allowed in some areas of North Bethany

Learn more about housing choices


While HB 2001 requires that all cities and counties within Metro allow more middle housing in certain areas, single-detached houses are still allowed. The law increases people’s right to build middle housing in more neighborhoods. This includes opportunities for people to convert single-detached houses into duplexes or triplexes. Some owners may opt to continue to live in part of their house while turning the rest into a separate unit. These conversions create extra income. 

Because some middle housing types are smaller than many single-detached houses, rents and prices could be lower. While Washington County cannot set rent or home prices, housing costs are often based on house size. Operating and maintenance costs can be lower for smaller homes as well.
 

The feasibility study


As part of our HB 2001 work, we got a grant from the state to study:

  • Factors that affect the likelihood middle housing will be built
     
  • Where in Washington County middle housing can develop most economically
     
  • How County actions might affect likelihood middle housing will be built

Learn more
 

Impacts of more middle housing


Development of middle housing is expected to happen gradually. The rate of development depends on the housing market and construction trends.

HB 2001 does not force property owners to develop middle housing – the law simply makes it easier for property owners to do so if they choose. Remodeling and redevelopment of houses or land to add more living units usually occurs when properties sell. Consider:

  • Only a fraction of County properties sell in any given year.
     
  • Middle housing will not be cost effective for all properties.
     
  • Not all sellers/buyers have the resources or interest to create middle housing.
     
  • In other words, the middle housing supply is likely to increase slowly.

See Middle Housing: Additional Details

 

Timeline

Rulemaking Icon Department of Land Conservation and Development rulemaking: 2020
Project Icon House Bill 2001 Implementation Economic Analysis and Market Research: October 2020–July 2021
Implementation Icon HB 2001 implementation: July 2020–June 30, 2022
  MH 1

Phase 1: Research and analysis scope project & outreach: July 2020–April 2021

  MH 2

Phase 2: Policy decisions: April-September 2021

  MH 3

Phase 3: Code writing: September 2021–January 2022

  MH 4 Phase 4: Adoption process: January 2022–June 30, 2022
Public Outreach Icon

Public Outreach

  • Online open house, survey: July-August 2021
     
  • Equity engagement process: September 2021-June 2022
     
  • Planning Commission, Board of Commissioners hearings: January –June 30, 2022

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

What do you think?


Housing affects all of us. Our middle housing plan is focused on equity, diversity and inclusion. Please consider taking part in this process. We want to hear from people of all ages, incomes, abilities, races, ethnicities, orientations, household sizes and personal or professional housing experiences and needs. We want to hear from you.

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